Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130209
STATION
CSPAN2 4
CNBC 1
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in history that this happened voluntarily at a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: how do we know that it's falling, how is it measured and are we talking about a year or a few years, a decade and where has it happened? >> guest: they keep track of these things as you know how many people there are and how many people are born eac
in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to live in the country? so what we have seen now in the global phenomena is everywhere from sweden to america and canada to i ran to singapore is people choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in human history that this is happen voluntarily on a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: well how do we know that fertility is -- that is how is it measured and are we t
a right to your religion. no help from the government at all on friday. >> this is part what have kathleen sebelius had to say. she said, today the administration is taking the next step in providing women across the nation with coverage of recommended preventive care at no cost, while reporting religious concerns. the administration believes it has met the concerns. >> well, shannon, for the many people whose religious rights are violated by this mandate, many of them have sued. they have been waiting for well over a year for something very simple, an exemption from the mandate. simply, that's what we do with people who have religious objections to laws. we exempt them. that's what these people have been waiting for and that's not what they got. the exemption that only applies to a house of worship was not expanded one inch. so the administration didn't do anything for the exemption or the business owners like hobby lobby. all they really did was propose a bookkeeping measure for certain religious organizations that may not really solve the problem at all. it wasn't a good feds for the re
up children, health, danger, a settlement disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book, my book of, i think, the most practical value to our daily lives, and, as a shameless author, i hope it is going to be my best-selling book. [laughter] it is about one i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies in new guinea of the last 60 years, and it is about what friends and others have learned from other trouble societies around the world. the essence of living in big, industrial societies and permanent housing with central governments to make decisions with writing and books and the internet. most people live past age 60, where we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you this evening, and we are most of us eating food -- food grown by older people. we forget that every one of those things arose very recently in human history. humans have constituted a separate line of biological evolution for about 6 million years. all of the things that i just mentioned did not exist anywhere in
on tolerance, justice and where no discrimination based on religion, gender or ethnicity can be accepted. so, president, i'm very pleased to see that your government is defending marriage for all. [applause] >> translator: that is also our stance on the issue. change is afoot in france, president, but also in europe. we need to continue in order to create a fairer social europe, one that shows solidarity and one which is stronger on the global stage. your role is crucial, president. do not give in to the vision of a single market that mr. cameron sees. that's not our vision of europe. quite the contrary, in fact. you need to say to mrs. merkel, mr. president: angela, eisenhower, brant, schmidt, cole, all of these men had a vision of europe. help me to achieve our vision of europe. you've said that you would recreate the french vision when you were elected, and now in the council you can help breathe life back into the european vision. thank you. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: thank you very much, indeed. now on behalf of the united liberals and -- [inaudible] displt th
or religion or government in any way, but obviously the fbi wants to rule that out, and the turkish authorities want to rule that out as well. they will prosecute this aggressively for the reason you just said. tourism, particularly american dollars, is very, very important to the government to the tax collectors to the public, to the economy in turkey. this cannot go unsolved for very long. >> they welcome -- the turkish authorities and american authorities have work very well together. >> yes, they have, particularly the fbi and the national authorities in istanbul. it's a modern country, notwithstanding its ancient roots, and law enforcement is prudent in that respect. the fbi could bo there tomorrow. we have an agreement with them. they wouldn't because of the cost and they wouldn't unless they were invite bid the written agreement between our state department and their foreign ministry permits the fbi to go in there on a whim. they could woo do so only if u.s. law was triggered because she was u.s.a. government employee or killed be an american. >> thank you, judge. >> the ener
and religion. if davis is released, he would be the first member of manson's so-called family to be released on parole. >>> fbi agents searching in a san joaquin county well for buried murder victims have not made any discoveries. authorities are searching for the victims of killer's wesley sherman tine and herman her sog. the well has reached a depth of 65 feet, but with no findings. sherman tine says the well is not one of his disposal spots. >>> new information this morning about the fatal shooting of a deputy in modesto. according to a new report, deputy bob paris was warned to be very cautious when serving an eviction notice on james ferraro. paris was reportedly told ferraro was likely armed and may have had bombs inside his modesto town house. paris and a locksmith were killed in april while trying to drill through a lock in the front door of the home. >>> should teachers carry guns on local campuses? a new survey shows california voters say no. 1200 voters were asked and 31% want teachers carrying guns at school. 67% favor hiring counselors over police officers. and 96% think emergen
nationalities and all different religions and we should show the rest of the world how to behave. >> with reference to the nazis, what was that? >> well, he fought in the battle of the bulge. he's a war hero. so that's the reference. >> so the fact that he was obviously dramatically influenced by world war ii? >> exactly. >> and that's still part of your life right now. and that's what -- you see some connection with your experience -- >> well, violence has to be stopped. >> war is the lowest form of human behavior. killing is the worst form of -- you know, i just finished writing a book -- i'm not plugging it right now, but i wrote, life is a gift. we are blessed with being alive. we should enjoy it and enjoy our neighbors and help our cousins and relatives and friends, one another. we should all help one another. it's a gift. we have a gift with our lives. >> well, mr. bennett, danny, tony bennett, thank you both for coming in. if you won't sing, we're going to play some clips that we love to hear from you. >> i love this video. i love it. ♪ ♪ she gets to hungry for dinner
and pop really got religion now? >> i think the answer to that is no. january is seasonally a very good month, as halls been with the year-end reinvestment and pension contributions, has been a very good month for mutual funds. it's better than it was in the summer and autumn and winter. just last year. and so it's not the big pop that one would think you'd get. i, for one, think that's good. you know, when mutual fund investors pile into equities, it's usually a very negative sign for the market. so something like the dow going 14,000, i can contain my enthusiasm about that. it doesn't mean very much. >> and a lot of people have pointed out some of the records that we broke this month -- or i should say january, sort of were a reminder of the last time we set those records, which not too happy days were soon to follow, jack. >> well, yeah, you're right about that. it's even more dramatic if you go beyond the dow which has its advantages, and great limits. you go to the nasdaq, and that index is around 4,700 at its high in 2000. and now it's -- you tell me, 3,200 maybe. it's still fully
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)